Welcome to my Blog

Here, I will discuss topics, and current trends on open, online, flexible and technology enabled/enhanced learning (OOFAT), including Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC), Open Educational resourses (OER), Open Educational Practice (OEP, and Open Educational Culture (OEC). In addition I will discuss current trends and news related to quality, innovation, serendipity, rhizome learning, agility, and leadership.

  • Ebba Ossiannilsson

Regional Consultation Meeting on Quality Assurance in Higher Education for the Western European Region

In Mid February, more exactly 15-16 February 2018, I was invited as keynote speaker to the Regional Consultation Meeting on Quality Assurance in Higher Education for the Western European Region, The role of Quality Assurance in Higher Education: challenges, developments and trendsThe role of Quality Assurance in Higher Education: challenges, developments and trends, Geneva, CICG, organized by UNESCO, and AAQ Schwitzerland. The event was part of the Regional Consultaton Meeetings aroud teh globe.

unesco logo 10

My presentation was in the session: 

11:00-13:10 Session 1 - Quality Assurance and the Diversification of Provision in Higher Education

Ebba Ossiannilsson, Swedish Association for Distance Education, Leader of EDEN SIG for QE in TEL, ICDE Focal Points on Quality, Sweden - "Quality models in online and open education around the globe: State of the art and recommendations"

Facilitator: Padraig Walsh, Chief executive, Quality and Qualifications Ireland (QQI), Ireland; Advisory Council Member, CHEA International Quality Group

My presentation had its point of departure from the ICDE research study Global overview of quality models: State of the art and recommendations. The study was carried out on behalf of the International Council for Open and Distance Education (ICDE) by a team coordinated by the European Association for Distance Teaching Universities (EADTU) is for:

  • institutional leaders responsible for quality in online, open and flexible higher education
  • faculty wanting to have an overview of the field
  • newcomers that want to develop quality schemes
  • policy makers in governments, agencies and organisations
  • major educational stakeholders in the international community  

The report provides the first global overview of quality models in online and open education, an overview which is very timely, delivered as it is for Global Education 2030, the new global educational agenda which replaces Education For All, EFA. The report is available in three parts, the Summary, the Complete report, and its Appendices.

The reflections from the Geneva Consultation Meeting, Europe exchanged on the challenges, developments and trends within Quality Assurance in Higher Education witness the great interest aroused among the 135 participants.The first positive echoes received were a great result already. The speakers’ presentations. They are now available for download on the event’s website. Some highlights are to be discovered on the photo gallery of the event.

The parallel event for the Eastern European region will be held in Moscow on 23-24 April 2018. 
> More information 

Results of the 6 regional meetings will be brought to the Unesco Global Conference on Quality Assurance in Higher Education, to be held in Paris on 21-23 November 2018.

  • Ebba Ossiannilsson

It’s time for the next generation of leadership

In the last year/s I have researched and reflected a lot on next generation of leadership in the digital era. I clearly see, and are convinced that even leadership has to change to respond to, and to be in the forefront to face,the rapid global changes, due to digital explosion in societies, which  clearly are pointed out by the UNESCO Sustainability Goals and especially SDG4, Education for all 2030, as well as the upcoming requirements due to the 4th industrial revolution, and in Europe the Digital Edcuation Action Plan 2020.

We stand on the brink of a technological revolution that will fundamentally alter the way we live, work, and relate to one another. In its scale, scope, and complexity, the transformation will be unlike anything humankind has experienced before. It is not clear how it will unfold, but one thing is clear: the response to it must be integrated and comprehensive, involving all stakeholders of the global polity, from the public and private sector to academia and civil society (World Economic Forum, 2016). In brief SDG4 aim to ensure inclusively, equality, equity quality education for all, and to promote lifelong learning.  In Europe, the European Commission adopted January 2018 a Digital Education Action Plan which includes 11 initiatives to support technology-use and digital competence development in education.

The action plan has three priorities, setting out measures to help member states meet the challenges and opportunities of the digital age:

Priority 1: Making better use of digital technology for teaching and learning

Priority 2. Developing digital competencies and skills

Priority 3: Improving education through better data analyses and foresight

It is becoming clear from my current research on next-generation leadership for education for all 2030, that there is an urgent need for modernization of not just the approach to education, but also for effective organizational leadership in the digital era. Leaders and managers can make a difference in higher education’s offers, services, processes, quality, and impact. The cultivation of a culture of quality is critical, and has to be in the interests of everyone, but also empowered, and encouraged by leaders (Ossiannilsson, 2017a 2017b, 2018, Accepted). There is an urgent need for people who have the knowledge, abilities, competencies, and attitudes to lead this process and analyze and evaluate digital work environments, using appropriate methods used to analyze complex digital environments.

In Europe, the D-Transform project aims to implement training programs for leaders of European Universities focusing on the major role played by digital technologies and OER in the necessary transformation of their institutions.

The premise is that e-education (digital pedagogy and training) can become a strategic tool for European universities, enabling them to be pedagogically more effective, more cost-effective, more attractive and able to meet the needs of the professional world with regard to youth training and life-long learning (D-Transform).

Some examples of my recent publications

Ossiannilsson. E. (Accepted, Published in May 2018). Leadership in a Digital Era: The Ecology of Ubiquitous Inclusive Learning. Distance Education in China, An International Forum.

Ossiannilsson. E. (2018). Leadership: In a time when learners take ownership of their own learning. In: K. Buyuk, S, Kocdar, and A. Bozkurt (Eds.). Administrative Leadership in Open and Distance Learning Programs, (pp.1-33). IGI Global.

Ossiannilsson, E. (2017a). Leadership in Global Open, Online, and Distance Learning. In: Keengwe, J. & P H Bull (Eds.). Handbook of Research on Transformative Digital Content and Learning Technologies, pp 345-373. IGI Global.

Ossiannilsson, E. (2017b, December 16). Re: It is time for the next generation of leadership (Web log message). Retrieved from ALTC Blog

Some examples where I have presented this urgent topic at conferences, just to mention the latest ones

MMVC2017, 2017. Innovative Leadership for Systemic Change (online)

Connecting Online Conference 2017. Leadership in a digital education and learning context

LUXATIA International, 2016. Leadership for quality in innovative learning spaces- Systemic sustainable changes

OEB16, 2016. Digital transformation: An Opportunity- or a treat to quality in higher education? 

  • Ebba Ossiannilsson

Innovative Learning Spaces and Cross Action Spaces

The 24th February, 2018 I gave an online speach at the Connecting Online Conference CO18, 23-25 February 2018, organized by Dr Nellie Deutsch. The conference area, with the shedule for the weekend and presentations of the speakers can  be found here. My speach was on Innovative Learning Spaces and Cross Action Spaces. Below some of the highlights from my speach. The full presentation, which is now on YouTube can be found here.

Over the past decade we have seen a rise in the adoption and proliferation of social technologies, and along with these a move to build on the capacity to embrace new pedagogies and practices that can open our boundaries for both teaching and learning. New Media Consortium, Horizon reports have emphasized Learning Spaces the last couple of years, lastly in 2017, as one of the emerging current emerging trends to consider for higher education, as technology and digitization is  rapidy developing.

Space, whether physical or virtual, can have a significant impact on learning. Learning Spaces focuses on how learner expectations influence such spaces, the principles and activities that facilitate learning, and the role of technology from the perspective of those who create learning environments: faculty, learning technologists, librarians, and administrators. Information technology has brought unique capabilities to learning spaces, whether stimulating greater interaction through the use of collaborative tools, videoconferencing with international experts, or opening virtual worlds for exploration. Together space, technology, and pedagogy empower learner success.

There are needs to develop new methods and frameworks for analysis which takes into consideration how we conceive, perceive and enact our digital spaces and how this impacts on our practices and approaches to teaching and learning within these spaces. Upcoming questions conserns for example:

  • How do we determine what we mean by space specifically in online environments and how can we examine whether our intentions for learning in them are effective?
  • How can these spaces be enacted as learning spaces and how do we design for them?

 Space can either be empowering or be limitations for learning and for learners as for example large lecture halls does not stimulate group discussion or dialogs, rather they can make barriers…but for example flexible learning spaces may empower and encourage actions, interactions, cross actions, and dialogues. So due to what will be achieved, learning spaces can be adapted or moderated. As learning spaces have an impact on and for learning, there are needs to cultivate a culture of innovate learning spaces.

Learning spaces need to be expanding outside the classroom/school or university. As for example what D Cormier emphasize the society is the curricula Next generation learners requires more of just for me, and just in time learning, and more authentic, and challenge-based learning. They are also more used to Internet and social media, which have to be integrated into learning spaces, for interactions’ and cross actions. Isa Jahnke argues for the need to move from interaction to crossactions. Under the premise that the digital world is a new form of multiple communication spaces, with many different layers, Jahnke argues that human action in such a networked world is not only grounded in interactions, but rather on multiple crossactions within and across such communication spaces --- cross-action-spaces.

As learning is unstructured, it can be learned in silos, or in a linear way. Here learning spaces makes a difference, to narrow real global problems, and it requires new innovative pedagogical approaches, as more of authentic and self determinated learning (heutogogy). Evolving pedagogical approaches concerned even leadership, as learning in and through more open spaces requires a shift in mindset related to allocation of time and resources, incentives, fundings, capacity building etc.  For more on leadership see my upcoming next blog.

In a recent paper in Open Praxis Michelle Harrison explored how we envision space, how a spatial perspective might be used to help assess and design these spaces, and e an analytical framework is provided to examine the tensions  encountered when teaching and learning in open digital spaces.

For more on my work on Innovative Learning Spaces and Cross Action Spaces, I have the two latest years keynoted and moderated the LUXATIA International Innovative Learning Spaces Summits., 2016, LUXATIA International Innovative Learning Spaces Summit 2017, adn will even do so for the upcoming Summit in 2018. Together with the group at the Summit, we set up an FB group on Innovative Learning Spaces.  

Luxatia ILS

I also work for Open Education Europa on Innovative Learning Spaces, please see my previous blog, where I gave a talk on Innovative Learning Spaces the 30 January, 2018.

OEE

In March 20, 2018, I will moderate the pre work shop on the  Future of Libraries at the Next Generation Learning Spaces conference 2018, in Manchester, UK.

 

  • Ebba Ossiannilsson

Innovative Learning Spaces

Today, 30 January, 2018 I moderated an online session for Open Education Europa (OEE), as an OEE Ambassador, OEE Fellow and expert in the areas of Innovative Learning Spaces

It was a lively discussion duirng one hour at lunchtime, the discussion is available here

Qustions addressed were 

Space, whether physical or virtual, can have a significant impact on learning. Learning Spaces focuses on how learner expectations influence such spaces, the principles and activities that facilitate learning, and the role of technology from the perspective of those who create learning environments: faculty, learning technologists, librarians, and administrators. Information technology has brought unique capabilities to learning spaces, whether stimulating greater interaction through the use of collaborative tools, videoconferencing with international experts, or opening virtual worlds for exploration. Together space, technology, and pedagogy empower learner success.

  1. Space as a change agent 

This topic aim to facilitate discussion on that space can either be empowering or be limitation for learning and for learners as for example large lecture halls does not stimulate group discussion or dialoges, rather they can make barriers, but for example flexible learning spaces may empower and encourage actions, interactions, cross actions, and dialogues. So due to what will be achieved, learning spaces can be adapted or moderated. Learning spaces need to be expanding outside the classroom/school or university. As for example what D Cormier emphasize the society is the curricula Next generation learners requires more of just for me, and just in time learning, and more authentic, and challenge-based learning. They are also more used to Internet and social media, which have to e integrated into learning spaces, for interactions’ and cross actions.As learning spaces have an impact on and for learning, there are needs to cultivate a culture of innovate learning spaces 

  1. Mind the gap (formal/informal; higher ed/working places; the society as the curricula)

This topic aim to facilitate discussion on blurring formal and informal learning, microlearning and as above on authentic learning. As learning is unstructured, it can be learned in silos Here learning spaces makes a difference, to narrow real global problems, as for example in working places with learning goals. Unstructured learning is learning with no real structure. In this kind of learning there’s no linear journey from A to B to C and so on.  Unstructured learning gives the individual students exactly what they need, which is space to grow.  They are given a clear understanding of the learning intentions and the criteria for their success. From there they forge their own paths, and the journey is continuous. It’s full of rich experiences of learning from mistakes and asking meaningful questions that lead to more delicious discoveries. In short, it’s what learning was meant to be. This approach also empower that the learners can take different approaches and or paths depending their own goals and needs, also due to pre-requisitions. Learning  by social media and through the crowd will be discussed, and how spaces can make a difference.

  1. Learning spaces and evolving pedagogical approaches

This topic aim to facilitate discussion on evolving pedagogical approaches, as for example unstructured learning, flipped classroom, authentic learning, self-determinate learning, competence-based learning, but also learning by failure and more, and how spaces either can empower or limit learning. Also learning by social media and through the crowd will be discussed, and how spaces can make a difference. Evolving pedagogical approaches concerned even leadership, as learning in and through more open spaces requires a shift in mindset related to  allocation of time and resources, incentives  fundings, capacity building etc. Space, whether physical or virtual, can have a significant impact on learning. Learning Spaces focuses on how learner expectations influence such spaces, the principles and activities that facilitate learning, and the role of technology from the perspective of those who create learning environments: faculty, learning technologists, librarians, and administrators. Information technology has brought unique capabilities to learning spaces, whether stimulating greater interaction through the use of collaborative tools, videoconferencing with international experts, or opening virtual worlds for exploration. Together space, technology, and pedagogy empower learner success.

This was my welcome address and introduction

A warm welcome everyone to the Open Education Europa Online discussion on Innovative Learnig Spaces

My name is Ebba Ossiannilsson

I am an OEE Ambassador and OEE Fellow

..and my contact details are

Ossiannilsson, Quality in Open Online Learning (QOOL) Consultancy https://i4quality.se 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. @EbbaOssian

https://se.linkedin.com/in/ebbaossiannilsson

I am a quality reviewer for the International Council for Open and Distance Education (ICDE) and for the European Association for Distance Teaching Universities (EADTU). Ossiannilsson is in the board for  ICDE OER Advocacy Committee and Quality Network Europe. Is in the EC for the European Distance Education Network (EDEN), where she is  ISO representative and  even leader of  the Special Interest Group on Technology Enabled Learning and Quality Enhancement.

I am the V President for the Swedish Association for Distance Education and for the Swedish Association for e-Competence, and also member of the Swedish Standards Institute (SIS) Quality Committee

Two years in a row I have moderated and chaired the Annnual confernce on Innovative Learning Spaces Summit by LUXATIA INTERNATIONAL. Please also follow the Facebook group on  Innovative Learning Spaces

ILS blog banner wide

 

  • Ebba Ossiannilsson

Blockchain in education

In November 22 2917, I wrote a blogpost on Blockchain, based on the report by Grech, and Camilleri, (2017). Blockchain is an emerging technology, with almost daily announcements on its applicability to everyday life. It is perceived to provide significant opportunities to disrupt traditional products and services due to the distributed, decentralised nature of blockchains, and features such as the permanence of the blockchain record, and the ability to run smart contracts. Read the full report

This is a follow up post, and the future will tell us, from experiences it is know that edcuation is not very fast to move into new technologies and digital trasformations and changes, which I have argeid in many of my own blogposts recently. This post reflects some of the thoughts by  Kernohan, in Higher Education: Policies, people, and politics, 21 December 2017, and Watter (2016), and Clark (2016) in their Blogposts.

Kernohan argues that almost all articles and reports focus on the  how questions, and explains how blockchain and bitcoins function, instead of focusing on the why questions which is more important. He stated that there are at least three limitations:

1. What is important are the downsides – and the first is inefficiency. With so many powerful computers entering the competitions, a great deal of energy is used for literally no purpose whatsoever. How much energy? Think running a medium-sized developed country for a year – that’s how much energy it takes to run the bitcoin blockchain for a year. Other chains are more efficient (Litecoin and the Etheriums) because they run their encryption competition in a slightly different way. But inefficiency also means slow transactions – minutes rather than microseconds.

2. A big problem is irreversibility – once something is on a blockchain, it stays there. If – say – you accidentally pay for something twice, you can’t just void a transaction, you need to set up another transaction to refund. Again this has an energy and time cost, but it also re-introduces trust into a trustless system. You have to rely on the person you transacted with to repay you as there are no built-in safeguards.

3. Anohter problem is artificial limitations. Cryptocurrencies like bitcoin are often limited as to the total possible number of coins that can exist. 

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Ebba Ossiannilsson is an e-learning expert and consultant with a range of research interests in the use of digital technologies for learning, teaching and research.
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